Formingo: Easy, free HTML form processing for static websites

One thing I ran across when building my website with Jekyll, a static website generator, was that it restricted my ability to have dynamic content, such an HTML form and blog comments.

Disqus, a popular service that manages comments, alleviated the latter pain, however, the inability to have a simple contact form was huge. There are a couple third-party services that allow you to build forms, but many of them (such as Google Forms) are unnecessarily complex. They often embedded in iFrames or take you to their own domain to submit the form, meaning that they present visitors with a form that doesn’t match the rest of the website stylistically, or are taken away from your website altogether.

To fix this, I built Formingo. Formingo is a new service that allows you to easily create HTML forms that get sent directly to your email address. It’s completely free to use for up to 500 submissions a month, and there are a ton of new features coming. In fact, just today, I launched pre-verified email addresses and domains.

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Introducing Jekyll Themes

The past week I’ve been busy with a small project of mine that I’ve been planning on getting off the ground since March of last year– Jekyll Themes. Jekyll Themes is a repository for authors to list themes and pre-built templates for the Jekyll static site generator.

While I’ve previously written about how to create a Jekyll website from scratch, a lot of developers or bloggers don’t necessarily want to spend the time designing or creating a website from a blank canvas. Thankfully, there are a lot of great themes out there, but many of theme are spread throughout individual GitHub pages and projects. Hopefully, with Jekyll Themes, the themes scattered across the internet can be consolidated into a single listing where they are tagged by their color scheme, responsive-ness, or other attributes.

Using Jekyll For Blazing Fast Websites

When I first started my blog, I used Tumblr. I didn’t choose it for the social integration or community, but rather to offload the management of servers to a third party.

My decision was justified when one of my posts, Captchas Are Becoming Ridiculous, hit the top spot of Hacker News. Over the course of two days, over 22,000 visitors visited my post. It’s common to see the servers of front page Hacker News posts struggle or even go down entirely due to the surge of traffic, but thanks to Tumblr, my website stayed online the entire time.

But while Tumblr was resilient to sudden surges in traffic, the service has had its struggles and periodically went offline. There’s several huge, day long gaps in my Analytics– a sign I need to move to another platform.

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Learning Jekyll By Example – The Ultimate Jekyll Tutorial

I’ve been working on this tutorial for the last few months, and it’s finally ready. You can read the tutorial for free or purchase the E-Book version to support me and future tutorials.

Jekyll is a static website generator that takes Markdown, Textile, HTML, or other formats and transforms them into a complete static website. The platform is extremely customizable and extensible.

While building a Jekyll website isn’t for everyone, it is a powerful platform that allows your website to perform great and be extremely secure. In fact, I run my own blog off of Jekyll, Amazon S3, and CloudFront. “Learning Jekyll By Example” walks you through this entire process, so if you’d like to learn how to setup your blog in the same fashion, this tutorial is for you.